STEAM Vault

Recommended books and media from
Cambridge Public Library & Cambridge Science Festival

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Kids Vault

Keep the community healthy. Stay home, stay safe, and stay entertained! 

We worked with our friends at Cambridge Public Library to come up with a fun list of books, podcasts, programs, and virtual experiences for you to explore.  Have fun & Stay curious!

Kids' Books

By

Sophia Gholz & Kayla Harren
2020 Notable Social Studies Trade Books list – Winning Title! 2019 Florida Book Award Gold Winner Recipient of the 2019 Eureka! Honors Award Winner -Best of 2019 Kids Books – Most Inspiring Category As a boy, Jadav Payeng was distressed by the destruction deforestation and erosion was causing on his island home in India’s Brahmaputra River. So he began planting trees. What began as a small thicket of bamboo, grew over the years into 1,300 acre forest filled with native plants and animals. The Boy Who Grew a Forest tells the inspiring true story of Payeng—and reminds us all of the difference a single person with a big idea can make.

By

Elizabeth Suneby & Rebecca Green
A boy, a science project and an answer to a critical problem. During monsoon season in Bangladesh, Iqbal’s mother must cook the family’s meals indoors, over an open fire, even though the smoke makes her and the family sick. So when Iqbal hears that his school’s science fair has the theme of sustainability, he comes up with the perfect idea for his entry: he’ll design a stove that doesn’t produce smoke! Has Iqbal found a way to win first prize in the science fair while providing cleaner air and better health for his family at the same time? Sometimes it takes a kid to imagine a better idea—make that an ingenious one!

By

Candace Fleming & Eric Rohmann
The giant squid is one of the most elusive creatures in the world. As large as whales, they hide beyond reach deep within the sea, forcing scientists to piece together their story from those clues they leave behind. An injured whale’s ring-shaped scars indicate an encounter with a giant squid. A piece of beak broken off in the whale’s belly; a flash of ink dispersed as a blinding defense to allow the squid to escape— these fragments of proof were all we had . . . until a giant squid was finally filmed in its natural habitat only two years ago. In this beautiful and clever nonfiction picture book about the giant squid, Candace Fleming and Eric Rohmann explore, both visually and poetically, this hidden creature’s mysterious life.

By

Ben Mezrich & Tonya Mezrich
Charlie Lewis goes on a roller coaster ride of risk, math, and gaming in this middle grade novel that parallels the New York Times bestselling Bringing Down the House, which inspired the movie 21. Charlie Lewis is a nerd. All he’s ever been good at is math—and he’s really good at math. So good that he’s recruited by a group of kids determined to game the system at the biggest theme park in the world—and win the grand prize. Soon Charlie is caught up in the excitement and thrill of using his math skills for awesomeness…but what’s at stake may be more than he’s willing to risk. How far will Charlie go for a chance at the ultimate reward?

By

Kate Messner & Matthew Forsythe
All it takes is one: one coral gamete to start a colony in the ocean, one person to make a difference in the world, one idea to help us heal the earth. The ongoing conservation efforts to save and rebuild the world’s coral reefs—with hammer and glue, and grafts of newly grown coral—are the living legacy of environmental scientist Ken Nedimyer, founder of the Coral Restoration Foundation. The Brilliant Deep is the proud recipient of the ALA Notable Children’s Books Award, the NSTA-CBC Best STEM Trade Books Award, the Junior Library Guild Selection and the ILA Teacher’s Choices.

By

Jess Keating & Marta Alvarez Miguens
At nine years old, Eugenie Clark developed an unexpected passion for sharks after a visit to the Battery Park Aquarium in New York City. At the time, sharks were seen as mindless killing machines, but Eugenie knew better and set out to prove it. Despite many obstacles in her path, Eugenie was able to study the creatures she loved so much. From her many discoveries to the shark-related myths she dispelled, Eugenie made wide scientific contributions that led to her being nicknamed Shark Lady.

By

William Kamkwamba & Bryan Mealer
Now a Netflix film starring and directed by Chiwetel Ejiofor, this is a gripping memoir of survival and perseverance about the heroic young inventor who brought electricity to his Malawian village. When a terrible drought struck William Kamkwamba’s tiny village in Malawi, his family lost all of the season’s crops, leaving them with nothing to eat and nothing to sell. William began to explore science books in his village library, looking for a solution. There, he came up with the idea that would change his family’s life forever: he could build a windmill. Made out of scrap metal and old bicycle parts, William’s windmill brought electricity to his home and helped his family pump the water they needed to farm the land.

By

Johanna Wagstaffe
Earthquakes are a terrifying yet fascinating force of nature. Seismologist Johanna Wagstaffe takes you through her own journey of understanding the earth beneath our feet. Along the way you’ll learn the science behind what makes the earth rumble and hear from kids around the world who have experienced the wonder, and terror, of an earthquake.

By

Fiona Robinson
Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.

By

Deborah Underwood & Meg Hunt
Once upon a planetoid, amid her tools and sprockets, a girl named Cinderella dreamed of fixing fancy rockets. With a little help from her fairy godrobot, Cinderella is going to the ball. But when the prince’s ship has mechanical trouble, someone will have to zoom to the rescue! Readers will thank their lucky stars for this irrepressible fairy tale retelling, its independent heroine, and its stellar happy ending.

By

Frieda Wishinsky
The Brooklyn Bridge, the iconic suspension bridge that connects Manhattan and Brooklyn, was completed in 1883. It is thanks to Emily Warren Roebling that the bridge was finished at all. Emily was not an engineer, but she was educated in math and science. She married Washington Roebling, the chief engineer of the famous bridge. When Washington became ill from decompression sickness, Emily stepped in, doing everything from keeping the books, to carrying messages for her husband, to monitoring the construction of the bridge. She was the first person to cross the Brooklyn Bridge when it opened.

By

Joyce Sidman
Bugs, of all kinds, were considered to be “born of mud” and to be “beasts of the devil.” Why would anyone, let alone a girl, want to study and observe them? One of the first naturalists to observe live insects directly, Maria Sibylla Merian was also one of the first to document the metamorphosis of the butterfly. In this visual nonfiction biography, richly illustrated throughout with full-color original paintings by Merian herself, the Newbery Honor–winning author Joyce Sidman paints her own picture of one of the first female entomologists and a woman who flouted convention in the pursuit of knowledge and her passion for insects.

By

Sarita Menon
Raise a kid who dreams big! Smore provides the inspiration and resources young kids especially girls need to grow up with confidence. We want to open new doors and push the boundaries of how children think about the world and their place in it. Science is everywhere and technology is a practical imperative of our lives. So we aim to be the media that informs, and inspires the youth to be scientifically and technologically literate. The idea for Smore became a reality through crowdfunding on Kickstarter in 2017. We continue to grow this international community and inspire our young readers to embrace their love for exploration and discovery and grow up to be the change makers of our world.

By

Andrea Beaty & David Roberts
Rosie Revere dreamed of becoming a great engineer. Where some people see rubbish, Rosie sees inspiration. Alone in her room at night, shy Rosie constructs great inventions from odds and ends. Hot dog dispensers, helium pants, python-repelling cheese hats: Rosie’s gizmos would astound—if she ever let anyone see them. Afraid of failure, she hides them away under her bed. Until a fateful visit from her great-great-aunt Rose (AKA Rosie the Riveter!), who shows her that the first flop isn’t something to fear—it’s something to celebrate. And you can only truly fail, if you quit.

By

Neil deGrasse Tyson
Neil deGrasse Tyson’s #1 New York Times best-selling guide to the cosmos, adapted for young readers. From the basics of physics to big questions about the nature of space and time, celebrated astrophysicist and science communicator Neil deGrasse Tyson breaks down the mysteries of the cosmos into bite-sized pieces. Astrophysics for Young People in a Hurry describes the fundamental rules and unknowns of our universe clearly—and with Tyson’s characteristic wit, there’s a lot of fun thrown in, too.
Kids' Podcasts

By

Andrew & Polly
It’s a podcast for kids about the world. Andrew & Polly and their friends consider music, science, art and culture in a fun-filled family-friendly podcast that parents enjoy and younger kids eat right up.

By

Hi, I’m Earth Ranger Emma! I’m a wildlife biologist and roaming reporter for the Earth Rangers podcast, the brand-new show for everyone who loves to explore the mysteries of nature. Come with me as I explore the deep jungle, the frozen Arctic and splash around some wetlands, all in the name of science!

By

Jonathan Messinger
FINN CASPIAN HAS HAD BETTER BIRTHDAYS. He can’t sleep, he can’t shake the feeling someone is following him, and he can’t stop the monsters who show up to smash his cake. In other words, it’s turning out to be more exciting than he expected. That’s all in the first few episodes of this award-winning, serialized podcast for kids. Finn, his friends and their pet robots aboard the Famous Marlowe 280 Interplanetary Exploratory Space Station discover uncharted planets, help aliens in far-off galaxies, and take tips from listeners back on Earth as they try to solve the universe’s great mysteries.

By

Vermont Public Radio
But Why is a show led by you, kids! You ask the questions and we find the answers. It’s a big interesting world out there.On But Why, we tackle topics large and small, about nature, words, even the end of the world.Have a question? Send it to us! Adults, use your smartphone’s memo function or an audio app to record your kid’s question (get up nice and close so we can hear). Be sure to include: your child’s first name, age and town. And then email the audio file to questions@butwhykids.org.

By

Carl Smith, Molly Daniels & Dr. Matt Beard
SHORT & CURLY is a fast-paced fun-filled ethics podcast for kids and their parents, with questions and ideas to really get you thinking. It asks curly questions about animals, technology, school, pop culture and the future.

By

Mr. Eric
What If World is a storytelling podcast for kids. What if a tiny dragon lived in my closet? What if there were a never-ending bowl of ice cream? What if cats ruled the world? Join Abacus P Grumbler, Randall Radbot, and Whendiana Joan as they help Mr. Eric tell wacky stories inspired by your questions! Call to leave a voicemail at 205-605-WHAT and be featured on the show.

By

Lindsay Patterson & Marshall Escamilla
Tumble is a science podcast for kids, to be enjoyed by the entire family. We tell stories about science discoveries, with the help of scientists! Join Lindsay and Marshall as they ask questions, share mysteries, and share what science is all about.

By

National Public Radio
Hosts Mindy Thomas and Guy Raz guide curious kids and their grown-ups on a journey into the wonders of the world around them. We’ll go inside our brains, out into space and deep into the coolest new stories in science and technology.

By

America’s Test Kitchen
Where food meets fun, three times a week! In this new podcast from America’s Test Kitchen Kids, kids AND their grown-ups will uncover the fun, fantastical, and fascinating sides of food. Each ingredient-themed episode builds to a grand finale: a mystery recipe cook-along. Get excited about cooking (and eating) by digging into the deliciously silly and unexpectedly educational.

By

American Public Media
Brains On! is an award-winning audio show for kids and families. Each week, a different kid co-host joins Molly Bloom to find answers to fascinating questions about the world. Our mission is to encourage kids’ natural curiosity and wonder using science and history…but there’s no age limit on curiosity, and episodes of Brains On can be enjoyed by anyone.
Kids' Movies & Television

By

MIT Nord Anglia Collaboration
Hello, world! We are your Curiosity Correspondents, bringing the cool research taking place at MIT straight to your screens. We are based at the MIT Museum at MIT.

By

NOVA
Bizarre stories from the slimy, smelly, creepy world of science. Gross Science from NOVA is produced by WGBH for PBS Digital Studios.

By

PBS Kids
Earth science and astronomy take center stage in this animated series from PBS Kids. Two neighborhood kids — Sean and Sydney — befriend the new kid on the block, Jet Propulsion, who just happens to be an alien from planet Bortron 7. Together they explore the solar system and how it affects the planet, while also learning about friendship and teamwork. The series features live-action interstitials with astronomer Dr. Amy Mainzer.

By

Amazon
A blue fox named Fig and his friends go on adventures and learn how things work in the world.

By

Eleven-year old genius and kid-scientist Anne has invented and built her own amazing androids. Nick discovers Anne’s secret junkyard laboratory and enlists the help of Shania to befriend Anne and her mechanical companions.

By

Jim Henson Company
In Doozer Creek, a self-sustainable community located just outside the view of humans, members of the Doozer Pod Squad design, create and innovate different things. Whether they’re designing a racecar or building a giant gingerbread house, the Doozers work together to solve problems. Young Spike Doozer pushes the other members of the team — including younger sister Daisy Wheel, pilot Flex and organization guru Molly Bolt — into action. The preschool series is based on characters from “Fraggle Rock,” a show that was popular in the 1980s.

By

Paramount
Buckle up for an epic adventure where anything is possible. A young girl named June with a big imagination makes an incredible discovery — the amusement park of her dreams has come to life. Filled with the world’s wildest rides and operated by fun-loving animals, the excitement never ends. But when trouble hits, June and her misfit team of furry friends begin an unforgettable journey to save the park.

By

PBS Kids
This animated series centers on house cat Fred, a dreamer of the great outdoors. Once his family leaves for the day, Fred becomes Nature Cat and with the help of his animal friends, he embarks on action-packed adventures that allow him to explore the natural world.

By

PBS Kids
The daily adventures of 10-year-old Alaska native Molly Mabray, her family, her dog Suki and her friends Tooey and Trini.

By

PBS Kids
Professor Fizzy is the Lunch Lab’s funny host who serves up a fun mix of nutrition information, healthy eating tips, and simple recipes — all while trying to foil the efforts of his evil nemesis Fast Food Freddy. Created around monthly themes, the site releases a new animated short video each week as well as a corresponding recipe for kids and their parents to enjoy. A variety of supplemental nutrition-based activities are available to extend the learning into the home.

By

PBS Kids
After being warped into Cyberspace from a library computer, Matt leads friends Jackie and Inez as Cybersquad. With live hosts Bianca and Harry, the team must protect Motherboard from the evil Hacker who wants to rule Cyberspace. Using gadgets and following clues, the team solves math mysteries and any other problem that comes their way.

By

PBS Kids
Designed to show kids that engineering is active, fun and collaborative, “Design Squad” brings together eight high schoolers, working together in two groups of four, to tackle engineering projects for actual clients. On each episode, the teams have two days to design, build, test and redesign their product before one team’s creation is declared best, and the teams are then reconfigured for the next task. In the finale, the top two scorers over the previous 12 episodes face one last challenge, with the winner awarded a $10,000 scholarship.

By

PBS Kids
“SciGirls” tries to get tween girls, ages 8 to 12, interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, STEM for short. Each episode follows a group of middle school girls who are eager to find answers to their questions while inspiring kids to explore the world around them and discover that science and technology are everywhere. The girls, with the help of scientific mentors, design their own investigations on topics ranging from the environment to engineering and nutrition. The show’s website is integrated into the episodes with archived projects from the site being featured on the show.

Teens & Adults Vault

Books, podcasts, and programs to keep you entertained while you stay home. Need a break from your family and roommates? Pop in your earphones and escape with your curiosity.

Stay home, stay safe, stay curious!

Teen & Adult Books

By

Knight Science Journalism
Undark is a non-profit, editorially independent digital magazine exploring the intersection of science and society. It is published with generous funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, through its Knight Science Journalism Fellowship Program in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

By

Rebecca C Thompson
In Fire, Ice, and Physics, Rebecca Thompson turns a scientist’s eye on Game of Thrones, exploring, among other things, the science of an ice wall, the genetics of the Targaryen and Lannister families, and the biology of beheading. Thompson, a PhD in physics and an enthusiastic Game of Thrones fan, uses the fantasy science of the show as a gateway to some interesting real science, introducing GOT fandom to a new dimension of appreciation.

By

Deborah Blum
The dramatic true story of how food was made safe in the United States and the heroes, led by the inimitable Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who fought for change. By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Lethal, even. “Milk” might contain formaldehyde, most often used to embalm corpses. Decaying meat was preserved with both salicylic acid, a pharmaceutical chemical, and borax, a compound first identified as a cleaning product. This was not by accident; food manufacturers had rushed to embrace the rise of industrial chemistry, and were knowingly selling harmful products.

By

Rachel Swaby
Fifty-two inspiring and insightful profiles of history’s brightest female scientists. “Rachel Swaby’s no-nonsense and needed Headstrong dynamically profiles historically overlooked female visionaries in science, technology, engineering, and math.”—Elle Covering Nobel Prize winners and major innovators, as well as lesser-known but hugely significant scientists who influence our every day, Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known. This fascinating tour reveals 52 women at their best—while encouraging and inspiring a new generation of girls to put on their lab coats.

By

Greta Thuberg
The groundbreaking speeches of Greta Thunberg, the young climate activist who has become the voice of a generation, including her historic address to the United Nations. In August 2018 a fifteen-year-old Swedish girl, Greta Thunberg, decided not to go to school one day in order to protest the climate crisis. Her actions sparked a global movement, inspiring millions of students to go on strike for our planet, forcing governments to listen, and earning her a Nobel Peace Prize nomination. No One Is Too Small to Make A Difference brings you Greta in her own words, for the first time.

By

Carl Sagan
Cosmos is one of the bestselling science books of all time. In clear-eyed prose, Sagan reveals a jewel-like blue world inhabited by a life form that is just beginning to discover its own identity and to venture into the vast ocean of space. Cosmos retraces the fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution that have transformed matter into consciousness, exploring such topics as the origin of life, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, spacecraft missions, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies, and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science.

By

Caroline Criado Perez
Data is fundamental to the modern world. From economic development, to healthcare, to education and public policy, we rely on numbers to allocate resources and make crucial decisions. But because so much data fails to take into account gender, because it treats men as the default and women as atypical, bias and discrimination are baked into our systems. And women pay tremendous costs for this bias, in time, money, and often with their lives.

By

Richard P. Feynman
Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. Here he recounts in his inimitable voice his experience trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek; cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets; accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums; painting a naked female toreador. In short, here is Feynman’s life in all its eccentric—a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.

By

Mary Roach
“One of the funniest and most unusual books of the year….Gross, educational, and unexpectedly sidesplitting.”—Entertainment WeeklyStiff is an oddly compelling, often hilarious exploration of the strange lives of our bodies postmortem. For two thousand years, cadavers—some willingly, some unwittingly—have been involved in science’s boldest strides and weirdest undertakings. In this fascinating account, Mary Roach visits the good deeds of cadavers over the centuries and tells the engrossing story of our bodies when we are no longer with them.

By

Richard Holmes
The Age of Wonder is a colorful and utterly absorbing history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science. When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery–astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical–swiftly follow in Richard Holmes’s thrilling evocation of the second scientific revolution.

By

Adam Higginbotham
Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand.

By

Margot Lee Shetterly
The #1 New York Times bestseller. The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

By

Stephon Alexander
“Music lovers are at high risk of being inspired by this exploration of the connections between music and physics.” —Wall Street Journal More than fifty years ago, John Coltrane drew the twelve musical notes in a circle and connected them by straight lines, forming a five-pointed star. Inspired by Einstein, Coltrane put physics and geometry at the core of his music. Physicist and jazz musician Stephon Alexander follows suit, using jazz to answer physics’ most vexing questions about the past and future of the universe.

By

Ruth Kassinger
Say “algae” and most people think of pond scum. What they don’t know is that without algae, none of us would exist. There are as many algae on Earth as stars in the universe, and they have been essential to life on our planet for eons. Algae created the Earth we know today, with its oxygen-rich atmosphere, abundant oceans, and coral reefs. Crude oil is made of dead algae, and algae are the ancestors of all plants. Today, seaweed production is a multi-billion dollar industry, with algae hard at work to make your sushi, chocolate milk, beer, paint, toothpaste, shampoo and so much more.

By

Tatiana Schlossberg
From a former New York Times science writer, this urgent call to action will empower you to stand up to climate change and environmental pollution by making simple but impactful everyday choices. With urgency and wit, Tatiana Schlossberg explains that far from being only a distant problem of the natural world created by the fossil fuel industry, climate change is all around us, all the time, lurking everywhere in our convenience-driven society, all without our realizing it.

By

Naomi Klein
#1 international and New York Times bestselling author Naomi Klein, author of The Shock Doctrine and This Changes Everything , makes the case for a Green New Deal—explaining how bold climate action can be a blueprint for a just and thriving society. For more than twenty years, Naomi Klein has been the foremost chronicler of the economic war waged on both people and planet—and an unapologetic champion of a sweeping environmental agenda with justice at its center.

By

Elizabeth Kolbert
A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us.

By

Talithia Williams, PhD
Power in Numbers: The Rebel Women of Mathematics is a full-color volume that takes aim at the forgotten influence of women on the development of mathematics over the last two millennia. You’ll see each eminent mathematician come to life on each page, women like the astronomer-philosopher Hypatia, theoretical physicist Emmy Noether, and rocket scientist Annie Easley. It is an affirmation of female genius and a celebration of the boundless applications of mathematics.

By

Dava Sobel
New from #1 New York Times bestselling author Dava Sobel, the “inspiring” (People), little-known true story of women’s landmark contributions to astronomy”A joy to read.” —The Wall Street JournalNamed one of the best books of the year by NPR, The Economist, Smithsonian, and Science FridayNominated for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award In the mid-nineteenth century, the Harvard College Observatory began employing women as calculators, or “human computers,” to interpret the observations their male counterparts made via telescope each night.

By

Claire Evans
The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and brogrammers. But the little-known fact is that female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation—they’ve just been erased from the story. Until now.Women are not ancillary to the history of technology; they turn up at the very beginning of every important wave. But they’ve often been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don’t even realize.

By

John Medina
How come I can never find my keys? Why don’t I sleep as well as I used to? Why do my friends keep repeating the same stories? What can I do to keep my brain sharp? Scientists know. Brain Rules for Aging Well, by developmental molecular biologist Dr. John Medina, gives you the facts, and the prescription to age well, in his signature engaging style. With so many discoveries over the years, science is literally changing our minds about the optimal care and feeding of the brain. All of it is captivating. A great deal of it is unexpected.

By

Susan Hockfield
From the former president of MIT, the story of the next technology revolution, and how it will change our lives. A century ago, discoveries in physics came together with engineering to produce an array of astonishing new technologies: radios, telephones, televisions, aircraft, radar, nuclear power, computers, the Internet, and a host of still-evolving digital tools. These technologies so radically reshaped our world that we can no longer conceive of life without them.

By

Tracy Kidder
Tracy Kidder’s critically acclaimed adult nonfiction work, Mountains Beyond Mountains has been adapted for young people by Michael French. In this young adult edition, readers are introduced to Dr. Paul Farmer, a Harvard-educated doctor with a self-proclaimed mission to transform healthcare on a global scale. Farmer focuses his attention on some of the world’s most impoverished people and uses unconventional ways in which to provide healthcare, to achieve real results and save lives.

By

Bill Bryson
In this book Bill Bryson explores the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer and attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. To that end, Bill Bryson apprenticed himself to a host of the world’s most profound scientific minds, living and dead. His challenge is to take subjects like geology, chemistry, paleontology, astronomy, and particle physics and see if there isn’t some way to render them comprehensible to people, like himself, made bored (or scared) stiff of science by school.
Teen & Adult Podcasts

By

Josh and Chuck
If you’ve ever wanted to know about champagne, satanism, the Stonewall Uprising, chaos theory, LSD, El Nino, true crime and Rosa Parks, then look no further. Josh and Chuck have you covered.

By

Stephen J. Dubner
Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Special features include series like “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.” as well as a live game show, “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.”

By

Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke
This podcast might not actually kill you, but it covers so many things that can. Each episode tackles a different disease, from its history, to its biology, and finally, how scared you need to be. Ecologists and epidemiologists Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke make infectious diseases acceptable fodder for dinner party conversation and provide the perfect cocktail recipe to match.

By

WNYC
A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.

Science Vs

By

Gimlet
There are a lot of fads, blogs and strong opinions, but then there’s SCIENCE. Science Vs is the show from Gimlet Media that finds out what’s fact, what’s not, and what’s somewhere in between. We do the hard work of sifting through all the science so you don’t have to.

By

Damon Krukowski
Ways of Hearing from is a six-part series, originally heard on Showcase, hosted by musician Damon Krukowski (Galaxie 500, Damon & Naomi), exploring the nature of listening in our digital world. Each episode looks at a different way that the switch from analog to digital audio is influencing our perceptions, changing our ideas of Time, Space, Love, Money, Power and Noise. This is about sound, and the ways we are using it to share information in the world right now. Our voices carry further than they ever did before, thanks to digital media. But how are they being heard?

By

WNYC
Covering the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies, Science Friday is the trusted source for news about science, technology, and other cool stuff. Host Ira Flatow mixes it up by featuring people in the know and those who want to be. Science Friday frequently features listeners that call in with their most riveting science questions.
Teen & Adult Movies & Television

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HBO
Produced by Oscar-winner Leonardo DiCaprio, George DiCaprio and Mathew Schmid and directed by Leila Conners, Ice on Fire is an eye-opening documentary that focuses on many never-before-seen solutions designed to slow down our escalating environmental crisis. The film goes beyond the current climate change narrative and offers hope that we can actually stave off the worst effects of global warming.

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Siena Construction
Great vision happens when art, science, and community come together. Explore the interplay between light and dark in a 10-foot diameter camera obscura built by Siena Construction! Video produced for the 2019 Cambridge Science Festival.

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National Geographic
One Strange Rock is a thrilling journey exploring the fragility and wonder of our planet, one of the most peculiar, unique places in the universe. It’s the extraordinary story of why life as we know it exists on Earth, brought into perspective by the only people to have left it behind: astronauts. This 10-part series was filmed in 45 countries, on six continents, and from outer space. Take a trip through and beyond our planet, revealing the twists of fate that have allowed life to thrive on Earth.

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National Geographic
Join the heroic quest for knowledge as we set course for the stars with the 21st century reboot of Cosmos. Hosted by world-renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, this 13-part ground-breaking series will venture to new worlds, trace our roots back to the hearts of ancient stars, and travel across the universe for a vision of the cosmos on the grandest scale.

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Theodore Melfi
Hidden Figures tells the incredible untold story of Katherine Jonson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monae) – brilliant African-American women working at NASA who served as the brains behind the launch into orbit of astronaut John Glenn, a stunning achievement that turned around the Space Race. The visionary trio crossed all gender and racial line and inspired generations.

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Ronin Films
From rooftop farmers to backyard beekeepers, Americans are growing food like never before. Growing Cities tells the inspiring stories of these intrepid urban farmers, innovators, and everyday city-dwellers who are challenging the way the USA grows and distributes its food. From those growing food in backyards to make ends meet, to educators teaching kids to eat healthier, viewers discover urban farmers are harvesting a whole lot more than simply good food.

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Jason Ward
Jason Ward has been an avid birdwatcher since he was a kid growing up in the Bronx, where he spotted a peregrine falcon eating a pigeon on a ledge outside his bedroom window. Join him as he travels around the United States meeting birders and bird enthusiasts of all kinds.

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GZA (The Genius ) & Red Bull
One of the founding members of the hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan, GZA, aka ‘The Genius’, takes us on a journey, meeting with the scientists and engineers that are shaping our future and bringing us into the strange complexity of his own imagination.

Virtual Vault

Explore the world from home. Check back for updates and fresh offerings! 

Virtual Vault For Kids

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Mari Wicks
Have you ever wanted to build a coral reef from scratch? Well, now you can! (But it’ll be out of paper, not ACTUAL corals…) A fun activity inspired by the book “Coral Reefs: Cities of the Ocean.”

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MIT J-WEL
MIT FULL STEAM Ahead is a collection of resources that MIT is putting together for teaching and learning online during the COVID-19 pandemic. MIT is curating existing resources for K-12, higher education, and workforce learners, as well as provide a weekly package of relevant materials for K-12 students and teachers.

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Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Nature can be a powerful antidote to all the uncertainty and disruptions that we find ourselves living in at the moment. Children especially can find comfort in activities that mirror the normal routines of school or daycare. For example, plenty of free play time outdoors is like having recess, and doing tasks, observations, and projects in the outdoors is like having science or center time in the classroom. Daily nature tasks that are simple, varied, and open-ended enough that children of all ages can participate at their own level. Get outside everyday and let the healing power of the natural world work its magic!

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Millipore Sigma
We are passionate about inspiring the next generation of scientists. We typically work to accomplish this through a variety of programs including SPARK, Curiosity Labs™ and the Curiosity Cube®, but as many families are home for a prolonged period of time, we wanted to help bring a little curiosity to you at home. We’ve created a number of easy and educational science experiments that can be completed at home with materials typically found around the house.

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Mass Audubon
Nature is everywhere! You don’t need to look further than your own backyard, neighborhood, or local park to discover the amazing wonders of the natural world. Find games, videos and citizen science activities and more for your back yard naturalist.

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Science Club for Girls
Join weekly STEAM activities with #SCFGathome. The SCFC mission is to foster excitement, confidence and literacy in STEM for girls, particularly those from underrepresented communities by providing free, experiential programs and by maximizing meaningful interactions with women STEM mentors.

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NASA
“What you cannot imagine, you cannot do”. Now imagine Astronauts on the Space Station reading stories to and conducting science experiments for the children of Earth as the world rotates below. Imagine no more…it’s Story Time from Space!

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Sophia Tyler Shrand
Science With Sophie is a STEM video series for girls and everyone. Tune in, get your science on, and laugh out loud!

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Kodable
Kodable is one of the best programming app for kids to teaching basic to complex level programme procedures. Kodable provides easy to follow lesson plans focused on student outcomes so teachers can teach their students to code, no computer science knowledge required.
All ages Vault

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Breakthrough Prize Foundation
The Breakthrough Junior Challenge is an annual global competition for students to inspire creative thinking about science. Students ages 13 to 18 from countries across the globe are invited to create and submit original videos (3:00 minutes in length maximum) that bring to life a concept or theory in the life sciences, physics or mathematics. This year, there is an additional COVID-19 category. The submissions are judged on the student’s ability to communicate complex scientific ideas in engaging, illuminating, and imaginative ways. The Challenge is organized by the Breakthrough Prize Foundation.

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MIT Press
MIT Press Live! will focus on timely topics and offer education and enrichment at a time when our usual sources are unavailable and many of us are confined to our homes. Events will cover topics such as critical thinking during a time of crisis; concentration in times of distraction; and navigating a pandemic-struck world. The series will also include talks and workshops on the great material revolutions of the last two centuries, extraterrestrials, and more.

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National Park Services
Watch the famous brown bears of Brooks River, go on a live dive in Channel Islands, or take a peek in a Bald Eagle’s Nest.

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Google
Explore more from the National Park Service. Enjoy panoramic views of famous sites in 360˚ Street View tours.

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Monterey Bay Aquarium
Be delighted by the antics of the sea otters or mellow out to the hypnotic drifting of the jellies. With ten live cams to choose from, you can experience the wonder of the ocean no matter where you are.

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NASA
Access Mars lets anyone with an internet connection take a guided tour of what those scientists experience.

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Ed Levine
An award-winning destination for millions of passionate, discerning, curious, and hungry readers around the world. Serious Eats is a leading resource for all things food and drink: meticulously tested recipes that really work; in-depth, science-based explanations of cooking techniques that are truly reliable; detailed reviews of cooking equipment; guides to ingredients, dishes, and cuisines; and food-focused essays, investigations, and profiles.

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