Curiosity Challenge 2020

 

Photo credit mneyid.com

About the Challenge

Calling all 5-14 year olds! The Curiosity Challenge is an annual contest that kicks off in the fall of each year, with entries due in February. Write an essay or poem, create a drawing, take a picture about your curiosity and tell us how it prompted you to explore your world.

What was before the big bang? How are we able to “see” things in our head? Scientists are driven by curiosity, and we want to know what YOU are curious about!

Awards

Winners will be honored at the Curiosity Awards Ceremony. Winners' work will be published in the annual Curiosity Challenge book!

Additional entries will exhibited at a Cambridge Community Television (CCTV) gallery show. Stay tuned for dates and details!

 

Photo credit mneyid.com

2019 Winners

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Each year we honor a Curious Scientist and  Curious Teacher.

Please join us in congratulating the 2019 winners!

2019 Curious Scientist

Professor Danielle Wood Director of the Space Enabled Research Group at MIT

Prof. Danielle Wood

Director of the Space Enabled Research Group at MIT
Dr. Danielle Wood is a professor in the Media Lab at MIT. She leads the Space Enabled Research Group, which applies space research and technology to social challenges around the world, like access to healthy food and clean water. When Dr. Wood was a 17 year old intern at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, she was lucky enough to watch the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory Telescope. At that moment, she knew she wanted to work on space research. CSF is partnering with the Chandra team to celebrate their 20th anniversary – all of the space images in our book, banners, and website were taken by that same telescope. Maybe Chandra will inspire you just as it did Dr. Wood!

2019 Curious Teacher
Dr. Michael Robinson Science Teacher, South Middle School, Brockton, MA

Dr. Michael Robinson

Science Teacher, South Middle School, Brockton, MA
Dr. Michael Robinson teaches science to 7th and 8th graders. As a child, Dr. Robinson was curious about anything mechanical, especially if it had a microchip or transistor. He’s still curious about things that mimic the human brain, no matter what the scale. Dr. Robinson’s family was homeless during his teen years, and he looked to education as a way to provide opportunity for a better life. Driven by his love of biology and education, Dr. Robinson went on to get his Ed.D. He now helps his students at South Middle School feel uplifted and empowered through science.